Advertisement
Film

The Last Letter from Your Lover review: a solid story with a strong casting

The Last Letter from Your Lover takes us back to the almost forgotten genre of the romcom. While there are some slight problems with the storyline, it’s a comforting watch all the same.

It’s been six years now since the quietly impressive film Man Up hit cinemas. Starring Lake Bell and Simon Pegg, it’s no earthshaker, but, as the PR campaign for the movie suggested at the time, it was becoming something of a rare breed. It was a romantic comedy getting a wide UK cinema release. Much was made of the fact that the romcom was back on the big screen, and once the film came and went it seemed like the genre packed its bags again and decided to go and live on streaming services instead.

Six years on, seeing  The Last Letter From Your Lover  on a cinema screen feels like a welcome anomaly. It’s billed as a romance over a comedy, but it’s not shy of wit and it feels the closest we’ve had to a cinema romcom in some time. It’s pretty good, too.

I can’t confess to having read the Jojo Moyes novel on which it’s based, but it didn’t take long at all to get into the swing of what’s going on. What we get here is basically two timelines. In the 1960s, there’s Shailene Woodley’s Jennifer Stirling, in a pretty rotten marriage and finding herself drawn to a potentially scandalous affair. Meanwhile, in the present day, there’s commitment-shy journalist Ellie Haworth – played by Felicity Jones – who uncovers a collection of letters dating back to the ’60s, that draws the pair of narratives together.

Director Augustine Frizzell’s film – based on a screenplay adaptation by Esta Spalding and Nick Payne – thus divvies up its time between the two eras, which has inevitable pluses and minuses. For instance, just as I found myself getting into the story of one era, the film jolted me back to the other. While I’m all for leaving people wanting a little bit more rather than less, it jarred more than I was expecting. I can’t say either that it took me long to work out just where it’s all going, and even though Frizzell brings a slightly different edge to it, there’s no real attempt to subvert expectations. Which leaves us with a solid, unspectacular story that lends itself easily to the pages of a novel, and a pretty by-the-numbers path to its ending.

But the significant plus here is the casting. In particular, there are two standouts. Woodley makes as much as she can of a fairly limited character, and has real, genuine screen presence.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Yet the highlight is the wonderful Jones. In another era, Jones could and perhaps should be a flat-out movie star, and this is perhaps the closest to such a role that she’s picked outside of Star Wars.

She’s superb, frankly, whether sparring with archivist Rory (Nabhaan Rizwan, on good form) or handling some of the more tender moments that I won’t spoil here. Reason alone to seek out the film, in fact.

Running to 10 minutes shy of two hours, The Last Letter From Your Lover is pushing its luck as it heads into its final act. It feels like the kind of beach read where you want to skip a bit faster through the rest of the pages to get to the next book. But still, I found myself really quite warming to it. Sure, it’s got problems, but it made me chuckle a couple of times and I just enjoyed spending time with the characters – even if I could take or leave what they were actually up to.

The Last Letter From Your Lover is in cinemas from August 6

Advertisement

Every copy counts this Christmas

Your local vendor is at the sharp end of the cost-of-living crisis this Christmas. Prices of energy and food are rising rapidly. As is the cost of rent. All at their highest rate in 40 years. Vendors are amongst the most vulnerable people affected. Support our vendors to earn as much as they can and give them a fighting chance this Christmas.

Recommended for you

Read All
The Muppet Christmas Carol actress Meredith Braun on When Love Is Gone being restored
Festive favourite

The Muppet Christmas Carol actress Meredith Braun on When Love Is Gone being restored

‘We’re making disobedience a virtue’ - Guillermo del Toro on Pinocchio
interview

‘We’re making disobedience a virtue’ - Guillermo del Toro on Pinocchio

Matilda the Musical: Tim Minchin's anarchic lessons for revolting times
interview

Matilda the Musical: Tim Minchin's anarchic lessons for revolting times

Ryan Reynolds: 'The great gift about getting older is you become more comfortable with sucking'
Interview

Ryan Reynolds: 'The great gift about getting older is you become more comfortable with sucking'

Most Popular

Read All
Here's when and where nurses are going on strike
1.

Here's when and where nurses are going on strike

Pattie Boyd: 'I was with The Beatles and everything was fabulous'
2.

Pattie Boyd: 'I was with The Beatles and everything was fabulous'

Here's when people will get the additional cost of living payment
3.

Here's when people will get the additional cost of living payment

Why do people hate Matt Hancock? Oh, let us count the ways
4.

Why do people hate Matt Hancock? Oh, let us count the ways