Advertisement
Music

Nick Cave, Brighton Dome

“Nick Cave prowls the front of the stage, leaning forwards to receive ballast and hem-touching from the faithful below…”

How does Nick Cave do it? How does he manage, in a career approaching its fourth decade, to turn in consistently riveting performances?

The key is that he still believes. The conviction, the passion, the trust in his own artistic endeavours all remain strong, fortified by a body of work that is increasingly impressive as the years roll by.

Cave hollers at the front rows with the zeal of a man possessed

It’s why at tonight’s show – billed as a homecoming for Brighton’s favourite adopted son – Cave hollers at the front rows with the zeal of a man possessed, as keen as ever to broadcast his funky, foreboding tales.

That back catalogue is extensive, affording Nick and co the luxury of selecting a few rare gems amongst the usual crowd-pleasers. But it’s the most recent album that anchors the set, the evening beginning with the record’s centerpiece, Jubilee Street. Cave and sidekick/cult hero Warren Ellis throw themselves into the task from the off, dispatching across the stage microphones, violin bows and anything else that gets in their way.

Of course, our man’s longevity is intrinsically linked to the swaggering Bad Seeds, a band capable of switching effortlessly from the eerie electro dynamics of We Real Cool to the balls-out menace of The Mercy Seat (a song that every right-thinking sinner must see live at least once.)

Advertisement
Advertisement

Clad in particularly shiny head-to-toe black, the 56-year-old Cave spends much of the evening prowling the front of the stage, leaning forwards to receive ballast and hem-touching from the faithful below. “Listen to the beating of their blood,” he sings on Tupelo, placing one swooning girl’s hand upon his heart.

Such is the confidence of those on stage, they follow the groovy schlock’n’roll of Stagger Lee with the last album’s haunting yet curiously rallying title track, Push The Sky Away, which closes the show.

Even bolder, the final encore is a brand new song called Give Us A Kiss, a spectral, delicate number that nevertheless percolates with seaside sleaze. It’s highly unusual, even for the Bad Seeds, gives a hint of where this fantastic band are going next – and it brings the house down.

There’s no stopping him, and praise be for that.

Advertisement

Bigger Issues need bigger solutions

Big Issue Group is creating new solutions through enterprise to unlock opportunities for the 14.5 million people living in poverty to earn, learn and thrive. Big Issue Group brings together our media and investment initiatives as well as a diverse and pioneering range of new solutions, all of which aim to dismantle poverty by creating opportunity. Learn how you can change lives today.

Recommended for you

Read All
The solution to racism controversy in opera is staring us in the face
music

The solution to racism controversy in opera is staring us in the face

Fragile: The Taiwanese protest song that China couldn't silence
Protest

Fragile: The Taiwanese protest song that China couldn't silence

P.P. Arnold: 'I was in a relationship with a white boy that just happened to be Mick Jagger'
Letter to my Younger Self

P.P. Arnold: 'I was in a relationship with a white boy that just happened to be Mick Jagger'

Born to run riot with surge pricing – ticket agencies have become the ticket touts
Music

Born to run riot with surge pricing – ticket agencies have become the ticket touts

Most Popular

Read All
Oil giants Shell and BP have been handed £700m of taxpayer cash despite bumper profits
1.

Oil giants Shell and BP have been handed £700m of taxpayer cash despite bumper profits

What are the risks of Don't Pay UK? We asked a leading lawyer
2.

What are the risks of Don't Pay UK? We asked a leading lawyer

How broken is the UK's public transport? I spent all day on buses to find out
3.

How broken is the UK's public transport? I spent all day on buses to find out

Sadiq Khan's Right to Buy-back scheme leads to return of 1,500 council homes
4.

Sadiq Khan's Right to Buy-back scheme leads to return of 1,500 council homes

Keep up to date with the Big Issue. The leading voice on life, politics, culture and social activism direct to your inbox.