Advertisement
In association with The Big Exchange

‘It might even be fun’: Bank of England set to publish first book demystifying UK economy

A Bank of England project will use proceeds from book sales to improve economic literacy in schools across the country

From the price of Freddos to how interest rates can affect a bank balance, the answers to our everyday cash quandaries aren’t always simple.

That’s why the Bank of England is publishing its first-ever trade book to help everyone understand why the UK economy functions the way it does, and what the bank’s role is within it.

Royalties from Can’t We Just Print More Money?, set for release on May 19 this year, will go towards buying more copies of the book to be donated to school libraries and promote economic literacy among younger generations.

Subscribe to The Big Issue

From just £3 per week

Take a print or digital subscription to The Big Issue and provide a critical lifeline to our work. With each subscription we invest every penny back into supporting the network of sellers across the UK. A subscription also means you'll never miss the weekly editions of an award-winning publication, with each issue featuring the leading voices on life, culture, politics and social activism.

“The economy – and economics – is all around us, in the decisions we all make every day at home, at work, or in the shops,” said Andrew Bailey, governor of the Bank of England.

“Despite this, economics is generally not well understood, and nor are economists. We hope that, as well as being an entertaining and informative read, Can’t We Just Print More Money? will help demystify economics and encourage people to learn how we can use it to tackle some of the biggest challenges facing the world today.”

The book was written by Rupal Patel and Jack Meaning, two young economists currently working for the bank. The “surprisingly witty” publication answers ten questions at the heart of the economic mechanisms which affect lives every day.

Advertisement
Advertisement

“Writing the Bank of England’s first book has been a pleasure and an immense privilege,” the economists said. “Doing so during Covid has made us even more aware that economics is not something that matters only inside the walls of the Bank of England, but in the daily lives of every one of us.

“We hope the book can show that economics is for everyone, not just economists. It might even be fun.”

The Big Exchange

Download The Big Exchange App today

Make your money count for more and download the free app from the Apple Store or Google Play.

The book’s publication will be partnered with a campaign to promote and improve everyday economic literacy across the country.

Advertisement

Support your local vendor

Want to buy a copy of the magazine? We have over 1,200 Big Issue vendors in the UK. Each vendor buys a copy of the mag for £1.50 and sells it for £3, keeping the difference. Visit our interactive map to find your nearest vendor and support them today!

Recommended for you

Read All
Money advice: How to access financial support quickly
Advice

Money advice: How to access financial support quickly

8 of the best budgeting bloggers and influencers
Money

8 of the best budgeting bloggers and influencers

Cost of living: tips to help keep your finances in check
Sponsored

Cost of living: tips to help keep your finances in check

Energy bills: why yours is now so expensive, and where all the money goes
Analysis

Energy bills: why yours is now so expensive, and where all the money goes

Most Popular

Read All
Homeless man who built wooden house on pavement: 'People understand I'm just in a bad situation'
1.

Homeless man who built wooden house on pavement: 'People understand I'm just in a bad situation'

The remarkable rise of Ncuti Gatwa: From sofa surfing and Sex Education to Doctor Who
2.

The remarkable rise of Ncuti Gatwa: From sofa surfing and Sex Education to Doctor Who

Exclusive: The UK's rarest and most threatened wildlife sites are not being protected properly
3.

Exclusive: The UK's rarest and most threatened wildlife sites are not being protected properly

Martin Lewis: 'The link between money problems and mental health problems is just so strong'
4.

Martin Lewis: 'The link between money problems and mental health problems is just so strong'

Keep up to date with The Big Issue. The leading voice on life, politics, culture and social activism direct to your inbox.