Advertisement
Environment

Why a tiny town in Lapland is bidding to host the summer Olympics

The residents of the Finnish town Salla are making the most of climate change, saying they’d be the perfect host of the 2032 Olympics: “Warm heart, we have it. Warm place, coming soon.”

A town in Lapland has announced a bid to host the summer Olympics in 2032.

“Welcome to Salla, the coldest place in Finland,” says local mayor Erkki Parkkinen in a tongue-in-cheek video declaring its candidacy, as residents explain how by 2032 Salla would be the ideal host.

“In 12 years, ice will be gone and this will be a perfect lake,” says a man taking a dip in freezing water while eating an ice cream. “No more slippery ice, thanks global warming!” adds a skateboarder.

Salla may only have a population of around 3,000 people – who are greatly outnumbered by the reindeer in the area – but it has plenty of sporting facilities.

A map of the town has been created showing where activities happen. Today there is skating and curling on the frozen lake. By 2032, those will become the swimming and beach volleyball arenas.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Like all other Olympic Games, branding is of prime importance. Salla’s logo has the yellow Olympic ring melting snow on a mountain. There’s also a mascot – Kesa the heat-exhausted reindeer.

But behind Salla’s not-so-serious bid is a serious point. It is to raise awareness of the impact climate change is having on towns like Salla that are seeing their climate changing.

Mayor Parkkinen explains: “If we stand back and do nothing, letting global warming prevail, we will lose our identity, and the town we love – as well as many others around the world – will cease to exist as we know it.”

The campaign asks us all to do what we can to save Salla.

“We’ve created this bid to raise attention about the climate emergency. Salla is changing. The whole planet is changing. Not in a good way.

“2032 will be a “turning point” in the battle against Global Warming. We either act now or our legacy to the next generation will be a worse planet than the one we met and we arrived to.”

Other cities considering making bids to host in 2032 include Budapest, Doha, Istanbul, Madrid, Mumbai and Shanghai. If the Tokyo games were cancelled again this year, it’s likely they would be awarded it, 2032 being the next free slot after Paris 2024 and Los Angeles 2028.

Advertisement

Support your local vendor

Want to buy a copy of the magazine? We have over 1,200 Big Issue vendors in the UK. Each vendor buys a copy of the mag for £1.50 and sells it for £3, keeping the difference. Visit our interactive map to find your nearest vendor and support them today!

Recommended for you

Read All
Shell consultant quits with explosive LinkedIn post accusing oil giant of 'extreme harms' to planet
Oil industry

Shell consultant quits with explosive LinkedIn post accusing oil giant of 'extreme harms' to planet

How you can help boost bee and butterfly populations with a new government app
Biodiversity

How you can help boost bee and butterfly populations with a new government app

Why is the UK’s air so polluted - and how can you check air pollution at your address?
Air pollution

Why is the UK’s air so polluted - and how can you check air pollution at your address?

The government has rejected calls to give the public more access to the English countryside
Right to roam

The government has rejected calls to give the public more access to the English countryside

Most Popular

Read All
Homeless man who built wooden house on pavement: 'People understand I'm just in a bad situation'
1.

Homeless man who built wooden house on pavement: 'People understand I'm just in a bad situation'

The remarkable rise of Ncuti Gatwa: From sofa surfing and Sex Education to Doctor Who
2.

The remarkable rise of Ncuti Gatwa: From sofa surfing and Sex Education to Doctor Who

Exclusive: The UK's rarest and most threatened wildlife sites are not being protected properly
3.

Exclusive: The UK's rarest and most threatened wildlife sites are not being protected properly

Martin Lewis: 'The link between money problems and mental health problems is just so strong'
4.

Martin Lewis: 'The link between money problems and mental health problems is just so strong'

Keep up to date with The Big Issue. The leading voice on life, politics, culture and social activism direct to your inbox.